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The Poppy Anemone

This was a fine border flower, with its crimson or scarlet petals and black centres that closely resembled poppies. According to Hibberd, the anemones could be easily divided into two classes, the A. coronaria (from 'the mysterious Levant') and the…

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The Pontic Azalea

Hibberd believed the Pontic Azalea (Azalea Pontica) was one of the greatest value plants within the Victorian garden. They were hardy, immensely showy when in flower, and had pleasing autumn foliage. The Pontic Azalea is a native of Asia Minor…

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The Phlox

According to Hibberd, garden phloxes, as illustrated to the left, had no proper existence as a species as they had been derived from so many species. Phloxes came in many sizes and colours, but by late Victorian times the white…

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Pheasant’s Eye

Pheasant's eye (Adonis autumnalis) was a precious old garden friend, the colours of which reminded the Victorian gardener of the pheasant. It was also known as rose-a-rubie and red maythes (an old herbal name), or 'red camamill' by country folk.…

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Morning Glory

The Morning Glory (or Major Convolvulua, or Pharbitis hispida or Ipomoea purpurea) was a sweet old favourite in the Victorian garden. It had been known for a long time in English gardens, being described in Stuart times as the "greater…

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The Mignonette

Lord Bateman saw the Reseda odorata, a 'weed' of northern Africa, in the Royal Garden of Paris in 1742, and brought seed home to England where it soon became famous for its delightful fresh scent. The French gave it its…

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Maréchal Niel Rose

This rose commemorates Maréchal Niel who conquered the Malakoff at Sebastopol in 1855, and who was the French Minister of War in 1867. While highly beautiful, the Maréchal Niel rose was not very hardy and tended to grow well in…

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Magnolia

Magnolia conspicua, var. Soulangeana (pictured) was a variety of one of the best known and most valued of hardy flowering trees in the nineteenth century. The deciduous magnolia was first introduced into Britain from China in 1789. The most well-known…

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The Lyre Flower

The Lyre Flower was referred to by a number of names in the Victorian age, Dielytra, Diclutra, Dicentra, Fumaria and Corydalis among them. Hibberd preferred 'Lyre Flower', simply because that was what it was first called on introduction into Britain,…

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The Blue Lobelia

The blue lobelia represented a pretty group of dwarf-growing, wiry-habited, free-flowering plants, mostly of a shade of blue, but occasionally of a white, rosy purple or a pucy pink. According to the treatment they received, they could be either annuals…

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