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The Blue Lobelia

The blue lobelia represented a pretty group of dwarf-growing, wiry-habited, free-flowering plants, mostly of a shade of blue, but occasionally of a white, rosy purple or a pucy pink. According to the treatment they received, they could be either annuals…

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Lily of the Valley

The 'flower of the poets', the lily of the valley was a British wilding most often found in moist woods and glens. As a popular garden plant it was particularly suited to similarly wild, moist positions within the garden, and…

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Lily of the Field

This particular lily (Lilium chalcedonicum) was often known in gardens as the scarlet martagon, but was quite distinct from Lilium martagon, commonly known as Turk's cap. It was not a particularly common flower in the Victorian garden border, although it…

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The Larkspur

The Delphinium formosum was ne of the most generally useful and accommodating of all flowers in the Victorian garden. There were many varieties about, the best being the branching, the hyacinth-flowered and the rocket, all of which came in many…

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Lapageria

The Lapageria rosea was a relatively recent introduction to Victorian Britain, being seen for the first time at Kew in 1847 (having been obtained from Chili). Hibberd described them as 'nearly hardy' and could be grown well in a cool…

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The Laburnum

Laburnum was an absolute favourite in the Victorian garden, partly because of its splendid golden flowers, and partly because it was capable of surviving (even thriving) in the poor soils of the smoky, sooty polluted cities of Victorian Britain. It…

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The Japan Quince

The Japan Quince (Pyrus Japonica, Cydonia Japonica) was a splendid garden tree. It flowered just after the turn of the year, which required that it be planted in a sheltered position. The Japan Quince did not produce much fruit, and…

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The Indian Pink

The Indian Pink was one of the more beautiful flowers in the Victorian garden. It was known as a biennial as it was usually sown in one summer, to flower in the next summer before it died. But the committed…

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Hydrangea

The hydrangea was a common sight in Victorian gardens. It was a hardy shrub, although people often grew it as a glasshouse, or window, specimen. The Hydrangea hortensis, pictured to the left, was a very common window decoration, and many…

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Hyacinth

Chief among the Victorian flower garden plants, the hyacinth was 'the best of domestic flowers' and a favourite display at floral exhibits. Victorian England imported many hyacinths from Holland, but they could be cultivated just as well at home. First,…

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