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The Honeysuckle

"Every plant has its place, just as every dog has its day, and the very place for this honeysuckle is the wall of a comfortable English cottage, where it appears more at home than anywhere else in the world, not…

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The Hollyhock

The hollyhock was introduced into Britain from China in the early eighteenth century, and reached the height of its popularity as a garden flower in the very early Victorian age. By the time that Hibberd wrote in the latter nineteenth…

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The Hawthorn

Then, as now, the hawthorn was a staple of Victorian hedgerows, while a double-flowering variety (pictured) was popular in Victorian gardens as a tree. The Glastonbury thorn was the most widely planted garden hawthorn by the late Victorian age. Information…

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The Guelder Rose

The Viburnum opulus (otherwise known as the snowball bush) were plentiful in Guelderland, which lay to the east of Amsterdam, where they made a striking showing every spring. It could be found in the wild in England as well, principally…

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Graceful Deutzia

Deutzia gracilis was a plant grown extensively for the flower markets of Victorian London. They were what Hibberd called "stolen plants" in that they tended to be grown between rows of other flowers, or in areas where nothing else would…

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The Gladiolus

The picture denotes a Gladiolus gandavensis, rather than one of the pretty cottage gladioli, which was originally raised in a Belgian garden. A somewhat tender plant, Hibberd nonetheless believed the gladiolus was "a beauty to be wooed in the pleasant…

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The Scarlet Geranium

Victorians loved their 'geraniums' - a very general name which people then, as now, also used to include pelargoniums. Hibberd carefully explained that Pelargoniums (or storkbills, which their seed pods resembled) mostly came from the Cape of Good Hope, while…

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Foxglove

There are any varied explanations for the common name of Digitalis -and indeed, about why a fox might need a glove (save to pad about secretly at night) - but the whatever the reasons for its naming, the foxglove was…

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Forget-Me-Not

There is an old English folk tale about a knight who drowns while trying to retrieve forget-me-not for his love, and the tale serves as a reminder that the forget-me-not thrives in moist conditions. While the native forget-me-not needed the…

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The Everlasting Pea

One of the more old-fashioned flowers within the Victorian garden, the everlasting pea (Lathyrus latifolius) could nonetheless hold its own against the many new species and varieties of flowers within the garden bed. When they had held their ground a…

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