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The Rosy Yarrow (Achillea)

Highly popular in the Victorian flower garden, the Rosy Yarrow, or Achillea aspelnifloria, graced many a flower border (it was distinct from the British Achillea millefolium). Cultivation was relatively simple, the plant requiring only good sun. It could be increased…

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The Rose Campion

The Rose Campion (or Agrostemma coronaria) - distinguished by its hoary leafage, its forked style of growth, the arrangement of its leaves in pairs and its single solitary flower - was a common sight in Victorian gardens. Hibberd adored the…

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The Perpetual Rose

Roses were one of the most popular Victorian flowers. The one depicted here was called the Perpetual Rose, a result of a varied crossing of the China and Bourbon roses. The 'hybrid perpetuals' were believed to be the most useful…

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Purple Clematis

By the late Victorian age there were many hybrids of the clematis available, many based on the Clematis patens, C. lanuginosa, C, viticella and C. Fortunei. Two of the most famous were those raised by Mr. George Jackman in 1858,…

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The Poppy Anemone

This was a fine border flower, with its crimson or scarlet petals and black centres that closely resembled poppies. According to Hibberd, the anemones could be easily divided into two classes, the A. coronaria (from 'the mysterious Levant') and the…

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The Pontic Azalea

Hibberd believed the Pontic Azalea (Azalea Pontica) was one of the greatest value plants within the Victorian garden. They were hardy, immensely showy when in flower, and had pleasing autumn foliage. The Pontic Azalea is a native of Asia Minor…

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The Phlox

According to Hibberd, garden phloxes, as illustrated to the left, had no proper existence as a species as they had been derived from so many species. Phloxes came in many sizes and colours, but by late Victorian times the white…

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Pheasant’s Eye

Pheasant's eye (Adonis autumnalis) was a precious old garden friend, the colours of which reminded the Victorian gardener of the pheasant. It was also known as rose-a-rubie and red maythes (an old herbal name), or 'red camamill' by country folk.…

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Morning Glory

The Morning Glory (or Major Convolvulua, or Pharbitis hispida or Ipomoea purpurea) was a sweet old favourite in the Victorian garden. It had been known for a long time in English gardens, being described in Stuart times as the "greater…

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The Mignonette

Lord Bateman saw the Reseda odorata, a 'weed' of northern Africa, in the Royal Garden of Paris in 1742, and brought seed home to England where it soon became famous for its delightful fresh scent. The French gave it its…

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