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Foxglove

There are any varied explanations for the common name of Digitalis -and indeed, about why a fox might need a glove (save to pad about secretly at night) - but the whatever the reasons for its naming, the foxglove was…

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Forget-Me-Not

There is an old English folk tale about a knight who drowns while trying to retrieve forget-me-not for his love, and the tale serves as a reminder that the forget-me-not thrives in moist conditions. While the native forget-me-not needed the…

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The Everlasting Pea

One of the more old-fashioned flowers within the Victorian garden, the everlasting pea (Lathyrus latifolius) could nonetheless hold its own against the many new species and varieties of flowers within the garden bed. When they had held their ground a…

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The Everlasting Flower

These were highly popular plants for the Victorian garden, mainly because they could be harvested for winter colour indoors. They were relatively easily cultivated, although some care did have to be taken. The everlasting flower (Helichrysum monstrosum) needed a dry…

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The Day-Lily

Hibberd wrote that the day-lily was not held in high repute in Victorian Britain, which surprised him as he believed them a showy and beautiful flower, particularly for shaded areas. There were perhaps a dozen varieties in cultivation in Victorian…

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The Incomparable Daffodil

Victorians adored daffodils. They were grown in huge numbers for the market gardens - more daffodils were sold than any other kind of flower. They were beautiful flowers, and they flowered early - enough to ensure their popularity, especially in…

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Cytisus (Leafy Broom)

Cytisus racemosus was a Victorian greenhouse favourite. As a pot plant for the greenhouse it was one of the easiest to manage, and thus admirably suited to the amateur gardener. It could grow in any light, loamy soil, with just enough heat to…

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The Cuphea

Cupheas (which belonged to the family of loosestrifes) were less popular in late Victorian times than they had been earlier in the nineteenth century - the one pictured to the left was called the Crystal Palace cuphea which dates it…

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The Crimson Petunia

Hibberd remarked that the petunia's (Petunia phoenecia) usefulness rested first on its beauty, and next on the ease with which it could be adapted to different decorative effects within the garden. The best way to grow petunias was to sow…

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The Crimson Flax

While the blue flax has provided fibre for fabrics since ancient Egyptian times, the crimson flax was a regular flower in the Victorian flower garden. Hibberd called it one of the most splendid hardy annuals known, capable of becoming a…

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